Organizational Management (Online) Courses

Required Business Courses

BUS 100 PROCESS OF MANAGEMENT

Campus:

An introduction to the business decision-making process through the study of the theory and practice of management. The manager’s tasks — planning, organizing, directing and controlling are reviewed through reading and case studies. The student is introduced to the concept of strategic planning and in line with today’s emphasis on productivity. Particular attention is paid to human resources and motivation. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 130 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

Campus:

An introduction to the study of management theory concerning human behavior in formal organizations. The student is given the opportunity to test theories through the analysis and discussion of a series of case studies. Suggested antecedent course: BUS 100. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 230 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

Campus:

A review of the theory of the effective management of human resources. The students examine employer-employee relations in such areas as equal employment opportunity practices, training and evaluation methods, compensation and reward or motivational programs, legal and regulatory requirements and the role of collective bargaining. The course utilizes the case method supplemented with an assigned text. Suggested antecedent course: BUS 100. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 235 HUMAN RESOURCES LAW

Campus:

A study of the legal concepts affecting the employer-employee relationship within organizations. Federal and state statutes/regulations and judicial decisions will be explored as they relate to the following: recruiting, hiring and placement; compensation; training, promotion and transfer; discipline and termination; affirmative action; retirement and benefits; performance appraisal; discrimination; safety and health; and unions and collective bargaining. Prerequisite: BUS 230. 1 semester, 3 credits.

MAT 151 FUNDAMENTALS OF STATISTICS

Campus:

An introduction to statistics, including probability, sampling distributions, correlations, predictions and hypothesis testing. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 495  ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH

Campus:

This course will focus on those skills required for scholarly writing in the fields of health administration, human services, and management. In addition to reviewing documentation and citation styles, accessing peer-reviewed journals using electronic databases, and knowing how to avoid plagiarism, this course will guide students through the style and structure of professional research writing. First, students will become familiar with the scholarly style of journal articles and will develop the ability to extract relevant information from those articles. Then, students will practice skills of narrowing the subject field, creating an annotated bibliography, writing a literature review, and creating a research question, all in preparation for their Capstone Research Seminar. Prerequisites:  ENG 103. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 498 CAPSTONE RESEARCH IN ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT

Campus:

The second part of a two-part capstone research course for students in the majors of community health and human services, health administration and organizational management, will teach students about the research methodologies that can be applied to the investigation of a research study of an individualized area of interest. Students will select an appropriate research methodology and design and will apply it to the research topic selected during the earlier course, BUS 495. The final project will be an academic paper reporting on an original research topic investigated by the student. Prerequisite: MAT 151 and BUS 495. 1 semester, 3 credits.

Elective Business Courses

ACC 200 FUNDAMENTALS OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

Campus:

Introduction to the field of accounting and to the development and use of financial accounting information in the business world. This course emphasizes accounting techniques and procedures, accounting theory and interpretation and use of accounting information. Topics include financial statements preparation, merchandising accounting, systems and controls, financial assets, plant assets, corporate accounting and financial statement analysis. For non-accounting majors only. Not open to freshman without prior departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken ACC 100 or equivalent. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 150 BUSINESS LAW I

Campus:

Introduction to the legal environment of business. General survey of the legal system, courts and procedures. Study of the law of contracts, agency, partnership and corporations. The course uses the case and text method. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 151 BUSINESS LAW II

Campus:

A continuation of Business Law I. Personal property, bailments, sales, commercial paper, creditors’ rights, real property, secured transactions and regulations of business. Prerequisite: BUS 150. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 155 INTRODUCTION TO SPORTS LAW

Campus: 

Fundamental legal concepts and principles applicable to the business of sports in the United States. Topics include risk management, agency law, employment law, gender equality, constitutional law, intellectual properly law, antitrust law, sports contracts, negotiation and arbitration. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 200 MARKETING

Campus:

A study of the importance of marketing to society and to the economy and its pivotal role in the business and nonprofit sectors. The course provides a firm foundation in marketing principles and in the strategic marketing planning process. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 223 MONEY AND BANKING (ECO 223)

Campus: 

The roles of money and credit, financial markets and institutions, and central banking in the U.S. economy. The banking system and its relationship with the Federal Reserve System, as well as international banking issues and problems, will also be analyzed and explored. Prerequisite: BUS 120/ECO 120. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 226/ECO 226 MICROECONOMICS

Campus:
Marginal analysis of demand and supply, the individual firm, and market microstructure. Consumer behavior and producer behavior. Alternative models of price determination and profit maximation. The relation between input and output markets. Prerequisite: BUS 120.  1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 232 LABOR RELATIONS

Campus:

A study of organized labor and its impact on the firm’s management and business strategy. Active student participation is expected in the discussion of the collective bargaining agreement. The rights of management in directing the workforce versus the rights of employees as expressed in the contract are explored. Selected cases involving such issues as technological change, job assignments, wage structure, grievance procedure, production standards and the role of the arbitrator will be utilized. Prerequisite: BUS 230. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 284 BUSINESS IN CYBERSPACE

Campus:

This course explores all of the aspects of electronic/Internet commerce. The field is evolving rapidly and students read the latest materials. However, the main approach of the course is experiential. Students do hands-on exercises and explorations that develop their appreciation for the present electronic commerce environment and also for what is likely to happen in the future. Prerequisites: BUS 200 and COM 140. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 288/COM 288 BUSINESS SYSTEMS AND DESIGN

Campus:
The design and development of information systems for a business environment. Topics will include analysis of information flow, design of business systems, specifications, equipment selection, and file organization. Detailed steps for each phase of the design will be related to business applications on a full-scale computer system.  Prerequisite: Any introductory computer course. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BUS 315  PRINCIPLES OF INVESTMENTS

Campus:
An examination of various facets of investment management.  Topics studied include the analysis of equity and debt securities, portfolio construction and management for varying objectives, mutual funds, performance measurement, the functioning of the securities markets, and socially responsible investing.  Prerequisites: BUS 120, BUS 219 or ACC213  1 semester, 3 credits

BUS 370 ADVANCED HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Campus:

This course is designed to analyze and explore current issues of significance related to the utilization and development of personnel. Students will be directed to undertake case studies on selected topics from the following areas: planning and staffing, performance appraisal and evaluation, training and development, labor relations and personnel law and quality of life at work. Where appropriate, cases and investigations will be regionally based. Prerequisites: BUS 230 and BUS 235. 1 semester, 3 credits.

GS 423 PRINCIPLES OF TRAINING AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT

Campus:

This course provides a survey of the methods used in the training and career development of employees in the service of individual and organizational effectiveness. Central to the course is its focus on planning, designing and implementing an overall training and development effort for an organization. 1 semester, 3 credits.

GS 424 TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT TECHNIQUES

Campus:

This course focuses on conducting a specific training and development program, including developing a needs analysis, creating program objectives, selecting an appropriate teaching methodology, identifying instructional aids and developing an evaluation instrument. 1 semester, 3 credits.

MKT 208 PUBLIC RELATIONS

Campus:
The study of Public Relations and its role as a communications and marketing tool. Corporate image, external and internal communications and firms’ relationships with various organizations are explored. Case study analysis and practice in writing press releases and other corporate communications are expected. Suggested antecedent course: BUS 200.  1 semester, 3 credits.

MKT 212 DIGITAL MARKETING

Campus: 

The course will cover areas of digital marketing and how it must adapt to ongoing technological advances. Topics covered will include strategic marketing on the internet, e-marketing research, digital positioning and branding, the use of social networks, integrated communications in digital media, digital competition and virtual merchandising.  Prerequisite: MKT 200. 1 semester, 3 credits.

MKT 302 RETAIL MANAGEMENT

Campus: 

A study of the marketing of goods and services to the final customer. Topics include the structure of contemporary American retailing assortment planning, inventory control, customer service, price, promotion and location strategies, international retailing and the interrelationship of retailing, society and the economy. Suggested antecedent course BUS 200. 1 semester, 3 credits.

MKT 310 CONSUMER MOTIVATION AND BEHAVIOR

Campus: 

The examination of consumer motivation and behavior employing the disciplines of anthropology, psychology and sociology. Freud, Skinner and Maslow’s theories are utilized. The purpose of the course is to enable the student to understand what motivates the consumer to buy and why. 1 semester, 3 credits.

Additional Required Courses

COM 140 MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATIONS I

Campus:
This course is designed as an introductory course to provide the background necessary for the effective use of microcomputers. The emphasis is on the major applications of microcomputers: word processing, relational databases, spreadsheets, and the use of the Internet. The course includes "hands-on" experience with common applications software. No previous computer related experience necessary. 1 semester, 3 credits.

COM 141 MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATIONS II

Campus:

This course is intended for students from all disciplines. It will develop intermediate and advanced word-processing, spreadsheet and database techniques, including macros, report generation, database queries, importing and exporting files, address books, labels, graphics and table manipulation. It will also include expanded Internet and World Wide Web topics. Prerequisites: COM 140 or equivalent or departmental approval. 1 semester, 3 credits.

ENG 103 WRITING FOR EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION

Campus:

Analysis and application of the principles of effective writing. Skill development in the performance of various writing tasks with attention to business communication. Research techniques also implemented. To be completed within first 18 credits of program. 1 semester, 3 credits.

GS 400 ADULTS IN TRANSITION

Campus:

Designed for adults, this seminar has two interrelated goals: to provide the opportunity for self-exploration and understanding and to support the development of a life, career and educational plan. Selected readings and exercises will focus on adult issues such as adult development through the life cycle, transitions, career exploration and development, life pattern differences between men and women, values and the creation of meaningful, realistic personal goals. 1 semester, 3 credits. Pass/No Credit.

GS 401 PROBLEM SOLVING FOR PROFESSIONALS

Campus:

This course focuses on the methodology of problem solving. Emphasis is placed on the application of various problem-solving models to life experience problems as well as to professional problems. Students will be asked to contribute problems from their own experience for analysis. 1 semester, 3 credits.

GS 402 CRITICAL THINKING FOR PROFESSIONALS

Campus:

The goal of this course is to teach students the analytical skills necessary for the assessment and evaluation of arguments, reports, newspaper articles and editorials as well as the application of these skills to the decision-making process attending their professional activities. 1 semester, 3 credits.

LIB 100 LIBRARY RESEARCH STRATEGIES

Campus:

This information literacy course is designed to teach students how to find the best information to meet their academic needs, as well as how to evaluate the information and use it accurately and ethically. 5 weeks, 1 credit.

PHI 268 ETHICS AND BUSINESS

Campus:

This course will examine the relation between ethical theory and business decisions, practices and policies. The meaning of ethics will be discussed and differences between morally right and other criteria of right action will be explored. Theory analysis and case studies will enable the student to make informed and intelligent value judgments concerning such issues as truth in advertising, affirmative action, profit motive, pollution, rights and responsibilities of workers. 1 semester, 3 credits.

Potential Additional Required Courses

ENG 109 ANALYTICAL WRITING

Campus:

Emphasis on logical progression, clarity, analysis and illustration in writing. Attention to grammar, sentence and paragraph structures, punctuation and usage as a backdrop to effective exposition, argumentation and editing of written material. 1 semester, 3 credits.

ENG 110 COMMUNICATION FOR PROFESSIONALS

Campus:
This course is designed to provide students with communication theories and proficiencies needed in professional organizations.  Students will study the structural principles of this type of communication and its specialized writing techniques and formats, strengthen critical and editing skill, polish grammar and vocabulary, examine verbal and non-verbal communication modes, develop expertise in speaking and listening effectively.1 semester, 3 credits

Available Liberal Arts Electives

ART 220 WOMEN IN THE HISTORY OF ART

Campus:

This art history course traces the art of women artists from the Renaissance to the present. Focusing on the contributions of a selection of women artists, the course provides a broad overview of their achievements. The course includes illustrated lectures, library research and trips to local museums. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BIO 109 CURRENT TRENDS IN BIOLOGY

Campus:

A consideration of biological topics of current interest to society including genetic engineering, gene banks, the human genome project, in vitro fertilization, Mad Cow disease and cloning. Note: A student may not take BIO 109 and BIO 110. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BIO 112 BIOLOGICAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

Campus:

A study of the nervous and endocrine systems and their relationship to normal and abnormal behavior. 1 semester, 3 credits.

BIO 130 INTRODUCTION TO IMMUNOLOGY

Campus:

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the immune system and to discuss the role of the defense mechanism in a human body. It covers the structure and function of the immune system and details how the immune system can be up-regulated for vaccination against infectious agents and down-regulated to treat autoimmune diseases. AIDS, immunotherapy, tumor and transplantation immunology will also be discussed.  1 semester, 3 credits. Note: A student may not take BIO 130 and BIO 131.

BIO 225 FORENSIC BIOSCIENCE

Campus:
The course covers the functions of the forensic bioscience laboratory and its relation to successful criminal investigation. Topics include crime scene and processing, investigative techniques, current forensic technology and related topics.  Upon completion, students will be able to identify and collect relevant evidence at simulated crime scenes, and request appropriate laboratory analysis of submitted evidence.1 semester, 4 credits.

CJ 158 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION

Campus: 
An overview of the history, structure and function of the police, prosecutor, judicial and correctional organizations, and their interrelatedness. Through readings and an examination of Supreme Court cases, policy issues such as sufficient evidence, use of discretion and legal concerns will be discussed. 1 semester, 3 credits.

CJ 244 CORRECTIONS

Campus: 

An investigation into the various punitive and rehabilitative philosophies and practices employed by the correctional field in dealing with crime and criminality. Topics include: history of corrections, theories of punishment, death penalty, sentencing, effectiveness of rehabilitation, community supervision, and restorative alternatives. Prerequisite: Non majors—no prerequisite. CJ majors — prerequisite CJ 158. 1 semester, 3 credits.

COM 200 COMPUTER SCIENCE: AN OVERVIEW

Campus:

For students from all disciplines. Topics include: computer organization, information representation in digital computers; data abstraction and data structures such as trees, lists and stacks; algorithm development and analysis; programming languages; hardware and software systems; information processing and database concepts; computer technology and society. Prerequisite: COM 140 or equivalent or departmental approval. 1 semester, 3 credits.

ECO 222 STATISTICS (BUS 222)

Campus:
Collection and tabulation of statistical data. Sampling. Probability. Binomial distribution and the use of the normal curve. 1 semester, 3 credits.

ENG 115 THE SHORT STORY

Campus:

Definition, characteristics, developmental history and stylistic trends of the short story as a literary form in different cultural traditions. Reading and interpretation of representative modern short stories both in English and in translation. 1 semester, 3 credits.

ENG 203 Advanced Expository Writing

Campus: 

This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to develop critical voices in expository writing. Emphasis is placed on the academic writing process, organizational patterns and development of rhetoric. Students will be able to create coherent writing whose purpose is to inform and explain. Instructors will also help students to understand and employ the basic elements of persuasive argument writing. This course includes a research component. Prerequisite: ENG 103. 1 semester, 3 credits.

ENG 218 MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

Campus:

Introduction to the literary heritage of the Western Middle Ages, with special emphasis on the Spanish, French, Italian and Latin backgrounds of Middle English. Rescued from obscurity are such important texts as the Owl and the Nightingale, the Apocalypse of Golias and the Testament of Cresseid, while the student is also invited to browse in the gardens of medieval romance, epic and the lyric. Prerequisite: a 100-level literature course 1 semester, 3 credits.

ENG 237 Modern american drama

Campus: 

A study of the major American dramatists of the twentieth century. Students will read approximately one play per week, with screenings of adaptations as assigned by the instructor. 1 semester, 3 credits.

ESC 113 SCIENCE IN SCIENCE FICTION

Campus:

Introduction to the many basic scientific principles can be effected by way of a film course in science fiction. The film-based course offers thought-provoking scenes related to topics in physics, astronomy, the greenhouse effect and nuclear phenomena. The course will be tailored each semester to investigate current events and technology. Prerequisite: MAT 105 or equivalent 1 semester, 3 credits.

GS 261 disabilities in society and the workplace

Campus:
This course provides students with the opportunity to participate in a focused exploration of a current topic pertaining to their field. Students may not earn more than 5 credits by taking CHA 426 or GS 427. Three one-credit options are not equivalent to a three-credit course and cannot be applied to the requirement of major electives.  1 semester, 1 credit.

HIS 152 Contemporary International Problems

Campus:

An in-depth study of selected controversial issues in the field of current history. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HIS 202 THE NON-WESTERN WORLD

Campus:

A survey of major non-Western civilizations from the 16th century to the modern era. This course provides a knowledge and understanding of social, economic and cultural issues as seen from a global perspective. Emphasis will be on Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HIS 208 WOMEN AND GENDER IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Campus:

A study of American women’s history from the colonial period to the present. This course will examine how the perception of gender helped shape and define women’s social, economic and political roles and was, in turn, influenced by certain characteristics such as class, religion, race and ethnicity. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HIS 255 A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

Campus:

This is a history of southern Africa, which eventually becomes the Republic of South Africa. Students will acquire a broad knowledge of Southern African history by means of a thematic survey of important issues in the country’s past. Themes will include colonialism, slavery, resistance, racism and apartheid, emergence of democracy and South Africa’s regional and international relations. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HIS 276 HISTORY OF NEW YORK: STATE AND CITY

Campus:

An analysis of the history of New York from its Dutch beginnings to the present day. In addition to the study of particular events, issues and individuals of importance to the state’s history, the emergence of New York City as a commercial, cosmopolitan center will be examined within the context of the region’s overall development. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HIS 335 AMERICAN CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION

Campus:

An examination of why the crisis occurred when it did, of the main actors in the tragedy and of the short and long range consequences of the War between the States. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HIS 360 THE VIETNAM ERA

Campus:

A seminar on the Vietnam War from its origins in the 1950s to the current debate over the legacy of the conflict. Competing interpretations of America’s involvement in the war and its consequences for her political culture will be analyzed. Prerequisite: HIS 172 or departmental permission. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HS 407 HUMAN SEXUALITY IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

Campus: 

This course will provide an overview of the psychological, biological and sociological aspects of human sexuality from adolescence to the senior years. The need for ongoing education throughout the life span will be emphasized. There will also be information on sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HS 443 MENTAL HEALTH AND CRISIS INTERVENTION

Campus: 

The emotional and psychological turmoil experienced by individuals as a result of a traumatic event or an unplanned event or loss will be explored in depth. Crisis theory, interventions and critical incident stress debriefing techniques for both individuals and groups in a variety of settings will be offered. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HS 453 THE PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING

Campus: 

Psychological theories of aging and development are used as a basis for considering the major role changes and adjustments confronting older adults. Topics include the normal challenges posed by retirement, family relationships, sexuality, sensory changes, intellectual and memory changes and loss. The second part of the course addresses issues of mental health, depression and dementia experienced by many older adults. Specific counseling approaches and other therapeutic interventions are also presented. 1 semester, 3 credits.

MAT 111  COLLEGE ALGEBRA

Campus:
Properties of numbers and expressions; linear and quadratic equations; systems of equations; exponents and logarithms; functions; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic. 1 semester, 3 credits.

MAT 241 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS

Campus:
This course presents the development of mathematics from the ancient times to the present. Major advances in the field are examined in some depth and how these advances contributed to the growth of the discipline as a whole. Topics include the birth of the axiomatic system as exemplified by Euclidean geometry, the prescience of Archimedes, the study of roots of polynomials, the development of the calculus and many other breakthrough topics. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PHI 160 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS

Campus:

What are the sources of morality? What makes an action right or wrong? What constitutes the good life? This course will explore these questions and examine related issues such as absolutism vs. relativism, objectivism vs. subjectivism, rules vs. outcomes. General theories will be applied to specific ethical dilemmas through discussion. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PHI 260 AN INQUIRY INTO CROSS CULTURAL GUIDES FOR LIVING

Campus:

This course will examine a selection of culturally and historically diverse manuals written as guides for achieving the good life. Our goal will be to examine and critique these foundational works about human nature and the achievement of happiness so as to reflect upon the universal elements that link them to together and render them meaningful to citizens of the 2First century. As part of the process we will explore contemporary examples and also examine the postmodern skepticism concerning the very concept of guides for living. Recommended: either PHI 124, 154, 160 or department approval. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PSY 100 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

Campus:

A broad introduction to the methodology, concepts and major content areas of psychology designed to provide the student with a scientific basis for understanding human behavior. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PSY 130 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT

Campus:

A comprehensive review of human growth and development from the prenatal period through infancy, childhood, adolescence and the various stages of adulthood up to and including old age, death and bereavement. Each developmental era will be examined in terms of its physiological, emotional, cognitive, interpersonal/social and relevant existential/spiritual aspects. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PSY 180 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN

Campus:

Examination of the biological, social and cultural influence on the psychological development of women. Focus on the vital issues that modern women face daily in a rapidly changing world. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PSY 210 COGNITIVE PROCESSES

Campus:

An examination of models of human cognition focusing on perceptual processes, mental representation, thinking and problem solving, reasoning, language, intelligence and creativity. Prerequisite: PSY 100. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PSY 220 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

Campus:

A comprehensive survey of adolescent behavior in its intellectual, emotional and social aspects. Techniques for enhancing the adolescent’s potential for growth and productivity are given special consideration. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PSY 230 ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING

Campus:

Focus on human development from early adulthood through middle age, aging and death. Emphasis is on the growth of the individual in relation to contemporary society, with theoretical viewpoints and empirical results from individual, social and developmental psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 100. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PSY 251 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Campus:

An analysis of the processes of social interaction and their effects upon the behavior and attitudes of individuals and groups. Prerequisite: PSY 100. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PSY 261 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY

Campus:

A survey of the major contemporary theories of personality and the important applications associated with each theoretical approach. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PSY 271 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Campus:

An examination of the diagnostic classifications of abnormal with an emphasis on causation and treatment. Prerequisite: PSY 100. 1 semester, 3 credits.

PSY 300 PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING

Campus:
An introduction to psychological measurement including the history of mental testing; the statistical concepts of test construction; and a survey of tests of intelligence, aptitude, achievement, personality and tests for special populations. Students will administer practice tests and participate in demonstrations of the major types of assessment techniques. Prerequisite: PSY 100. 1 semester, 3 credits.

RS 123 New Testament

Campus: 
This course is a contemporary critical study of the message and the meaning of the New Testament, of its origin, and of the historical situation in which it was written. Important scriptural terms, ideas, and themes are examined. Emphasis is given to the traditions which formulate the faith demands of the New Covenant and its proclamation: Jesus Christ, Son of God, Savior. 1 semester, 3 credits.

RS 130 belief and unbelief in the modern world

Campus:
New approaches for examining the rational foundations of religious faith with special emphasis on the problem of God and the sources of unbelief in contemporary culture; a consideration of religious and peak experiences; the current question of “God-Talk”; the nature of faith and its relationship to reason and to theology. 1 semester, 3 credits.

RS 134 SACRAMENTAL THEOLOGY

Campus:
A study of the contemporary theology of the sacraments and their role in the Christian’s life within the Church. The ongoing dialogue within the Christian Churches in the area of sacramental theology is examined in depth. 1 semester, 3 credits.

RS 144 WOMEN IN THE JUDEO-CHRISTIAN TRADITION

Campus:
This course seeks to examine the contributions as well as the contemporary understandings of women in life, theology and ministry. The course will also endeavor to present the contributions of women in the search for God in theology and spirituality. 1 semester, 3 credits.

RS 166 CONTEMPORARY CATHOLICISM

Campus:

A study of contemporary Roman Catholicism, which will connect the teaching and practice of the church today to the teaching of Jesus and his first followers. Attention will be given to the sacramental nature of the church, the vision of Vatican II and the principles that guide Catholic moral teaching. The rich spiritual traditions of the church and the issues that face the church at the beginning of the new millennium will also be considered. 1 semester, 3 credits.

RS 173 QUEST FOR GOD

Campus:
A study of humanity's prayerful attempts on commune with God as these have developed in both the East and the West. Analysis of the common elements found in the prayer experience as well as the differences from diverse cultures, philosophies and the like. 1 semester, 3 credits.

RS 205 religion and ecology

Campus: 
The goal of this course is for students to attain an understanding of Earth, its living creatures, and its life-giving system as a matter of religious faith and ethical concern. The course will draw on biblical texts, focusing on the Jewish-Christian traditions and world religions as they contribute to valuing the natural world. In dialogue with official church statements and with essays from first and third world theologians, students will examine the connections between ecological justice and social justice. 1 semester, 3 credits.

RS 300 INTERDISCIPLINARY READINGS ON PEACE AND JUSTICE

Campus:

A course of selected readings, lectures and discussions of the theories and practical applications of peacemaking. Views on the possibilities for peace and justice in the 2First century will be presented from various disciplines. Required for all peace and justice studies minors. 1 semester, 3 credits.

SCI 130 CHEMISTRY AND NUTRITION

Campus:

This investigation of the chemicals in the diet includes nutrients and their sources, vitamins, food additives. Some of these chemicals are studied in terms of their reactions and interactions in metabolic pathways. Contemporary diets and fast foods are evaluated and disorders related to improper diet are considered. This course is appropriate to satisfy non-laboratory science core course requirements. Not open to students who have completed SCI 135. 1 semester, 3 credits.

SOC 136 SOCIAL PROBLEMS

Campus:

An introduction to sociology through an examination of what society considers to be social problems with a view toward showing how society produces these phenomena and to what extent they are solvable. Areas include: crime, mental illness, drug abuse, alcoholism, other forms of deviance, poverty, racism, conflicts over power. 1 semester, 3 credits.

SPC 130 INTRODUCTION TO THE THEATRE

Campus:

A study of the origins of theater; an examination of the elements of theater and its relationship to life; student participation in theater experiences. Prerequisite: SPC 102. 1 semester, 3 credits.

SPC 205   INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

Campus:
An introduction to the sociological and psychological factors that influence communication among people of different cultures.   Lectures and discussions will focus on developing an understanding of the all-too common barriers to effective communication found today in business, teaching, social work, government, etc. Prerequisite: SPC 102  1 semester, 3 credits

SOC 243 CRIMINOLOGY

Campus:
An examination of sociological concepts, theories and perspectives regarding the study of crime. Topics include: the amounts and trends of crime; theoretical explanations; policies of crime control.  Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 136 1 semester, 3 credits.

SPC 218 NORMAL LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

Campus:

An intensive study of typical language development, theory and practice as advocated by leading researchers in the field. Prerequisite: SPC 102. 3 hours a week, 1 semester, 3 credits.

SPN 222 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION

Campus:

Focus on improvement of writing, oral and analytical skills. Open to students who have completed SPN 211, 212 or 221 or with special permission. 1 semester, 3 credits.

Other Electives

CJ 324 RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Campus:
A fundamental understanding of research design and data analysis in criminology and criminal justice. The course will examine quantitative and qualitative research methods (experimental design, quasi-experimental design, surveys, field research, secondary data analysis), types of data and measurement, probability and sampling techniques. Prerequisite: CJ 158. 1 semester, 3 credits.

EDU 180 Self-Exploration and Career Search

Campus:
An interdisciplinary approach to expanding the knowledge of oneself in relation to the choice of a career. Sources of information include the evaluation of one’s values, skills, aptitudes and abilities and how they pertain to a future profession. 1 semester, pass/no credit.

EDU 181 CAREER SEARCH II

Campus:

An interdisciplinary approach to career possibilities and the skills needed to secure employment in today’s market. Résumé preparation, professional correspondence, the application process and interviewing skills are included. 1 semester, 3 credits.

GS 111 Experiential Portfolio Seminar

Campus: 
This course is designed to facilitate the assessment of prior learning for the purposes of composing and constructing an experiential portfolio as professional narrative. Emphasis will be placed on an exploration of the theoretical foundations of prior experiential learning for the adult student. Students must take GS 111 before their last semester. In order to register for the seminar, students must be fully matriculated, have earned 36 credits toward their degree at St. Joseph’s or elsewhere, have attained a 2.5 GPA, have met with a PELA adviser and have obtained the adviser’s written approval. Prerequisite: ENG 103, approval of PELA coordinator. 1 semester, pass/no credit.

HA 244 HEALTH CARE POLICY

Campus: Online Course

This course describes what health care policy is, how the policy analysis process works, and the different roles health professionals can play in setting and implementing health policy over time. The course will also provide an overview of some of the major policy issues facing health care in this country. 1 semester, 1 credit.

HA 246 HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS AS FIRST RESPONDERS

Campus: Online Course

The people who perform management work in health care organizations - those who occupy positions of managerial authority - face unprecedented changes and challenges. This course is a one credit seminar which focuses on current challenges facing health care administrators. This course addresses the challenges faced by health care administrators in planning for, and responding to public health emergencies due to man-made and natural disasters. Specifically, emergencies which have the potential for large numbers of casualties and where health care workers face personal danger during and after the crisis. This is an overview course that emphasizes the unique and daunting challenges faced by the health care delivery system health care workers as first responders in terms of protecting public health, personal and professional risks, and the role of the health care manager in crisis and disaster planning and management. 1 semester, 1 credit.

HA 247 TAKING SIDES: CLASHING VIEWS

Campus: Online Course

This course is about controversial bioethical issues as they relate to the provision of health care services including bioethical theories, principles, and methods, key bioethics cases from US courts, evolving standards for ethics consultation, and areas of clinical bioethical controversy and consensus. 1 semester, 1 credit.

HA 430 HEALTH CARE DELIVERY SYSTEM

Campus: 
An in-depth study of the organization of the U.S. health care delivery system. Special attention is given to practices and problems affecting providers and consumers of health care. Recent changes in the financing mechanisms and their impact on distribution of services are discussed. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HA 433 MANAGED CARE

Campus: 
An overview of the evolution of managed care and current trends, including systems terminology, public policy, and market performance issues. Students who have taken the one-credit course CHA 426 Health Topics: Managed Care cannot take the 3 credit course. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HA 481 HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT 

Campus: St. Joseph's College,Brooklyn Campus St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus Online Course
An overview course dealing with health care management. Included in the course are such topics as effective management, supervision, organizational structures, decision making, personnel and staffing, performance appraisal, finance, budgets, fiscal operations, facilities maintenance and services distribution and control. State codes and accreditation standards are reviewed. Not to be taken by students who have taken BUS 100. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HA 484 LEGAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH CARE

Campus: 
A review of the basic legal concepts affecting the health care delivery system. Topics discussed include aspects of malpractice in health care, practitioner and institutional liability, legal rights of the consumer, administrative law, medical records, and the role of regulatory agencies. 1 semester, 3 credits.

HA 492 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

Campus:
This course familiarizes students with everyday anatomy and physiology terminology used in medical areas such as physician’s offices, hospitals, clinics, insurance and pharmaceutical firms. Students will be instructed on how to
derive the meaning of medical words by learning to easily separate word components, as well as to identify all major body parts by their correct language name. The course provides essential background knowledge for successful ICD-9-CM coding and other areas such as CPT coding and billing. 1 semester, 3 credits. Offered when there is sufficient
student demand

Also Available

COM 240 Human Computer Interaction

Campus: 

This course will present human computer interaction (HCI) from the theoretical and design perspectives. HCI explores the study, design, construction and implementation of human-centric interactive computer systems. Topics will include interfaces, cognitive and social interaction design, human-centered evaluation, techniques for developing effective interfaces, accessibility, application domains and the user experience. Students will gain practical experience by completing a semester long project to demonstrate their mastery of HCI concepts. Prerequisite: COM 150 or COM 152.

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