Speakers Bureau

Speakers Bureau

St. Joseph’s College is proud of its faculty and the very high level of academic excellence that permeates the entire institution. In addition, St. Joseph’s is deeply committed to a spirit of service to the community. These two central pillars, scholarship and service, inform and define the culture of SJC. In merging the two, St. Joseph’s College is pleased to provide a speaker’s bureau to support local academic, educational and cultural institutions in our common goal.

Listed below is a collection of talks and presentations that SJC faculty members are prepared to give, free of charge. Institutions wishing to avail themselves of this service are invited to contact the individual faculty member, directly, to negotiate the scheduling of a presentation. 

Athletics | Education | Management | Mathematics | Psychology 
 

AVAILABLE FACULTY PRESENTATIONS

Mathematics

The Optimal Basketball Free Throw

Faculty Member's Name: Dr. David Seppala-Holtzman

Faculty Contact Information: [email protected]

Description of Presentation: When attempting a free throw in basketball, the player has essentially two components under his or her control: the angle of the shot and the force with which the ball is thrown. We find the shot most forgiving of error.

Intended Audience: General

Hard/software Needs: A computer with PowerPoint and a projector and a screen.


What is the Shape of the Universe?

Faculty Member's Name: Dr. David Seppala-Holtzman

Faculty Contact Information: [email protected]

Description of Presentation: This presentation makes an elementary case for the universe being a hypersphere, S3. Higher dimensions are introduced along with generalized definitions of spheres and balls. That the universe is a hypersphere then follows directly from the properties of S3 and what we know of the universe.

Intended Audience: This talk can be given to an advanced high school class or to college undergraduates.

Hard/software Needs: A PC with PowerPoint software, a projector and a screen.


Converging on the Eye of God

Subject: Mathematics

Faculty Member's Name: Dr. David Seppala-Holtzman

Faculty Contact Information: [email protected]

Description of Presentation: The "Eye of God" is the name given to the perceived center of the golden spiral that is generated by chopping off smaller and smaller golden rectangles from a given one. It turns out that the coordinates of the Eye of God arise in a most unexpected way.

Intended Audience: This talk can be given to an advanced high school class or to college undergraduates.

Hard/software Needs: A PC with PowerPoint software, a projector and a screen.


Art and Mathematics: Making Beautiful Music Together

Subject: Mathematics

Faculty Member's Name: Dr. David Seppala-Holtzman

Faculty Contact Information: [email protected]

Description of Presentation: This presentation seeks to highlight the relationship between mathematics and art by focusing upon the rich area where they intersect.

Intended Audience: Upper-level high school or college undergraduates.

Hard/software Needs: A computer with PowerPoint and a projector and a screen.

Return to top


Management

Leadership: Practical Implications for the Organization

Faculty Member's Name: Dr. Robert M Krug

Faculty Contact Information: [email protected]

Description of Presentation: This discussion will focus on three primary areas: 1) a practical definition of leadership and its relationship to "management"; 2) the qualities of great leaders; and 3) the implications of the digital world on being able to fulfill the leadership role. The discussion can be customized to an organization’s current needs.

Intended Audience: General management

Hard/software Needs: Computer with Microsoft PowerPoint and digital projector

Return to top


Education

Let the Games Begin! Supporting Literacy at a Play-Based Laboratory Preschool

Faculty Members' Names: Karen Russo and Susan Straut Collard 

Faculty Contact Information: [email protected] and [email protected]

Description of Presentation: This multimedia presentation will focus on the interactions of three-, four-, and five year-olds enrolled in a play-based, laboratory pre-school learning environment. The presenters assert that these children are abundantly prepared to read and write, although formalized literacy instruction is not part of the school’s curriculum. During a 20-minute slide show, this evidence is captured by video and still photographs of play activities that reveal children’s engagement with literacy. In addition, interviews with children, their parents, and their teachers will communicate the importance of play and its! critical role in literacy development.

Intended Audience: Parents, teachers and early childhood students

Hard/software Needs: Equipment to display powerpoint and audio for powerpoint

Return to top


Psychology

Understanding Depression

Faculty Member's Name: Dr. Peter Lin

Faculty Contact Information: [email protected]

Description of Presentation: A licensed psychologist will provide basic information on diagnosis, etiology, prognosis and treatment of mood disorders.

Intended Audience: Community Members

Hard/software Needs: PowerPoint, laptop, video software

Return to top


Athletics

Perception of Adult-to-Child Communication in Youth Athletics

Faculty Member's Name: Dr. Joe Ross

Faculty Contact Information: [email protected]

Description of Presentation: What messages do parents and coaches believe that they are SENDING to children in the context of youth athletics? What messages do children report that they are RECEIVING … and how closely do these perceptions match? Of greatest import, what is the impact of such messages on the self-concept and overall well being of the child/athlete? The speaker utilizes interviews with participants, observations of youth leagues, and review of past research in offering a discussion/presentation on this important topic.

Intended Audience: Replete with stories and anecdotes, this topic may be presented in a light yet meaningful manner to a “general” audience of families, players, and coaches (e.g., a CYO breakfast or a Little League dinner). It has also been adapted and delivered to more targeted audiences of youth league coaches and league directors, with specific emphasis on the impact of messages – both intended and unintended – on the well being of the child.

Hard/software Needs: None

Return to top