M.A. in Infant/Toddler Early Childhood Education Course Descriptions

CS 505 TEAM BUILDING AND COLLABORATIVE DECISION MAKING: PARENTS AND PROFESSIONALS

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

The purpose of this course is to provide the communication skills required for those engaged in reciprocal relationships with families. Family-centered practices, the provision of resources and supports to parents and families and the inclusion of jointly developed family identified outcomes will be addressed in ways that are responsive to cultural, linguistic and other family characteristics. The components of team building will be practiced in classroom simulations. Students will explore their own strengths and challenges by engaging in self-assessment procedures, reflection and critiques. All of the knowledge base will be addressed in the context of legislation related to providing infant/toddler early childhood educational services. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the fall.

CS 510 LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT: DIVERSITY AND DISORDERS

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

A study of theories of language development and an examination of the effects of language disorders as they relate to mild, moderate and severe disabilities. Discussions and lectures will focus on appropriate ongoing assessment procedures as they relate to theories of cognition, perception, information processing and memory. Consideration of cultures and language development and the introduction of a second language will be addressed. Field experiences will relate to language development, assessment and procedures for reporting data. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the fall. This course requires six hours of fieldwork.

CS 525 HEALTH AND MEDICAL PROBLEMS: YOUNG CHILDREN WITH MILD, MODERATE AND SEVERE DISABILITIES

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

This course will focus on the recommended practices for the delivery of service by early intervention and early childhood special educators. It provides an overview of child development principles with the consideration of factors that influence learning, behavior and independence. Attention will be given to rights to privacy, confidentiality and respect for differences in physical, health and behavioral challenges which include the range of moderate to severe with multiple disabilities. Students will access, read and engage in discussion, field experiences and research related to health and medical issues that require special education. Experiences are designed to teach students to be reflective and respectful of cultures and learn how culture, language and socioeconomic status influence early childhood development and practices. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the spring. This course requires six hours of fieldwork.

CS 540 ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

This course has two basic goals: to expose students to the principles of basic educational research methodology and to have students plan and design a research proposal. Emphasis is placed on the role of research for the work of the early interventionist and the early childhood special education teacher. It is expected that students striving to be professionals in the field of early childhood will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to distinguish between legitimate claims and conclusions of research findings and ill-founded ones. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the fall.

CS 550 SUPERVISED PRACTICUM AND SEMINAR

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

The seminar and practicum placement provides an opportunity for the student to apply theories of child development, both typical and atypical, apply current research with emphasis on cognitive, motor, social-emotional, communication, adaptive and aesthetic development in learning situations, family and communal contexts. Students will plan and implement developmentally and individually appropriate curricula and instructional practices based on knowledge of individual children, the family and curricula goals and content. They will make specific adaptations for children who have learning/developmental needs or disabilities. Students will demonstrate appropriate uses of technology including adaptive and assistive technology as well as the selection of appropriate materials and equipment. During the seminar, students will reflect and engage in discussion on professional practices, analyze and evaluate field experiences, as they work with families and other professionals. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the spring and summer. This course requires a full semester practicum experience.

CS 560 ADVANCED SERVICE SEMINAR

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

This course is provided for students who have three or more years of teaching experience in the areas of infant/toddler early childhood special education. During the semester experience, students will explore current theoretical and methodological issues and problems: social, political and cultural, as they relate to families and children receiving services in infant/toddler early childhood programs. As a way of contributing new information and expertise to the program where they are currently employed, students will conduct a needs assessment and design a staff development program for any level of staff or parents. The curricula for this staff development program would be developed from recently acquired knowledge gained in the graduate program. Skills would include: designing and conducting the needs assessment, implementing the principles of teaching and learning, the selection of appropriate instructional materials, utilization of effective communication skills and the principles of protocol and ethics. The instructional event would be designed for adult learners. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the spring.

CS 570 SOCIAL STUDIES EARLY CHILDHOOD: METHODS AND MATERIALS 0-GRADE 2

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

This multi-focused course will emphasize the knowledge base of what young children should learn in the area of social studies. Current theories of social studies content that emphasize self-esteem, emotional intelligence, problem solving and inquiry as they relate to the New York standards are incorporated. Students will become familiar with relevant content areas such as curriculum integration and children as researchers. Emphasis will also be on the role of differing culture, nurturing practices, communication style, attitudes of cultures toward disabilities and how these factors affect the role of the early interventionist. Special education law as it pertains to the dominant role of parents, CPSE meetings and transitions and the role of the interventionist and teacher will be explored. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the summer. This course requires five hours of fieldwork.

CS 575 ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS: READING/WRITING CONNECTION FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

This course will focus on the creation of developmentally appropriate activities that are theory based for infants/toddlers and early childhood children with diverse learning needs. The course connects with early childhood curriculum as well as the New York State Learning Standards. The course will offer fieldwork opportunities for students where they can implement meaningful hands-on experience and apply theory to practice. The course will include a survey of literacy approaches used with students with special needs. A review of various levels of age appropriate storybooks and how to use these books with infants/toddlers will provide a framework for developmentally appropriate literacy practices. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the fall. This course requires five hours of fieldwork.

CS 580 SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS AND TECHNOLOGY: CURRICULUM, METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

This course is designed to give teachers a basis for presenting the early childhood sciences, mathematics and technology concepts to young children with special learning needs and their parents. Concepts derived through activities involving water play, magnets, planting, cooking, food and nutrition will be included. Language-building activities and creative arts activities will be integrated as well. Bibliographies and Web resources can be among the resources researched and shared by the students. Students will note the connection between the New York State Learning Standards and the curriculum as they plan and implement projects in the fieldwork environment. Concepts related to assistive technology and the adaptation of materials to meet special needs will be presented. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the spring and summer. This course requires five hours of fieldwork.

CS 605 ASSESSMENT INFANT/TODDLER EARLY CHILDHOOD: CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

In this course, students will learn to conceptualize assessment as a flexible, collaborative, decision making, ongoing process where parents and professionals are engaged to make and revise judgments and reach consensus about the medical, educational and mental health service needs of young children. Students will become familiar with various assessment instruments, test administration and the writing of clear reports. Students are encouraged to be mindful that when instruments and procedures accommodate a child’s sensory response, affective and cultural characteristics, they are equitable. Emphasis will focus on linking assessment to individual program planning, instruction, services and progress. In the fieldwork placement, student will learn to rely on authentic measures of problem solving that link directly to New York State Standards and program content goals in natural settings. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the spring. This course requires eight hours of fieldwork.

CS 625 NEUROLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

The purpose of this course is to enhance the awareness of the student to sensory motor development and neurobehavioral organization during infancy/ toddler and early childhood. Implications for learning, memory, neurological disorders, assessment and program planning will be considered. Opportunities to practice competencies in field experiences would include: the concept of role release in the trans-disciplinary model, modeling, demonstrations, coaching and feedback. The use of instructional technology and the provision of assistive technology as vehicles for more effectively serving children and families will be considered. Students will learn to consider chronological age appropriateness and developmentally appropriate practices for infant/toddlers and young children when selecting types of assistive technology in assessment and intervention. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the spring. This course requires eight hours of fieldwork.

CS 705 PLAY AND LEARNING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

This course will introduce students to the ways in which young children develop meaning, by providing a bridge between child development and curriculum studies. Students will learn to build play into curriculum strands as a condition for learning; they will learn the significance of creating inclusive settings that enable all children to participate actively and as independently as possible. Instructional strategies that include large muscle play and opportunities to connect the integrated nature of the children’s development with learning will be modeled on site. Students will be given a strong knowledge base that includes a variety of instructional strategies that integrate with the child’s developmental needs. In the fieldwork experience, students will demonstrate the understanding of skills and a strong knowledge base appropriate to the age group 0-grade 2 in a natural environment. They will engage in, integrate coordinate activities, games and stories that balance cultural and linguistic patterns. There are two-and-a-half lecture hours a week during one semester; the course is offered in the fall. This course requires seven hours of fieldwork.

CS 730 INDEPENDENT STUDY

Campus: St. Joseph's College, Long Island Campus

Independent study with guidance from a faculty member includes the expectation that the student will design and present an instructional module in the form of a workshop. The audience may be parents of children at risk for developmental delay, faculty and students, or the staff at the field placement or where one is employed. The student will be expected to select a topic that is related to the infant/toddler early childhood program; a relevant issue, method or procedure related to the development of instructional materials. A theoretical basis for the content, supportive research and bibliography must be included. Arrangements should be made for taping the event. Class offered when needed.

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