SJC College Experience Courses

SJC College Experience Courses

TUITION

$300 plus the cost of books

Deadlines

Application: September 26

Payment: September 30

Courses — Fall 2019

ENG 106 — Dramatic and Visual Writing        

A course in script-writing designed to give students an opportunity to develop skill in the writing of short and/or long works for stage and/or screen. Students will also be expected to read work in progress and respond to each other's writing in class. As they sharpen their own writerly voices, students will become acquainted with a variety of genres and styles, learn the value of revision, and foster a sense of community.        

3 credits - Class meets Wednesdays, 4 – 7 p.m., Oct. 2 through Jan. 15 (no class on Dec. 25 or Jan. 1) 

COM 150 — Introduction to Computer Programming     

This course offers a basic introduction to computer hardware and software. Elementary programming techniques will be taught using Visual Basic.Net. Emphasis will be on problem solving using the computer. Students will be able to use scientific and inquiry methods when working with mathematics and scientific information and use appropriate mathematical and scientific instruments and technology. They will also develop their ability to solve multi-step problems and construct logical arguments and demonstrate a proficiency in organizing, analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating quantitative and qualitative information. 

3 credits - Class meets Saturdays, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m., Oct. 5 through Jan. 18 (no class on Nov. 30 or Dec. 28)

CS 102 — Child Psychology and Development II

A study of the patterns of physical, cognitive, social/emotional development of the child age two through adolescence. Topics include theories and research applicable to the developmental sequences in cognition; play and peer relationships; parent/child relationships; pro-social and moral development; cross-cultural perspectives; and contemporary social problems. This course includes the required NYS/NYC Board of Education curriculum and reporting of suspected child abuse or maltreatment. 5 hours of directed observation of children.        

3 credits - Class meets Wednesdays, 4 – 7 p.m., Oct. 2 through Jan. 15 (no class on Dec. 25 or Jan. 1)

Apply to the SJC College Experience

Spring 2020

COM 125 — Foundations of Computer Programming Using Animation     

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students will learn how to use computers for problem solving by creating algorithms, coding solutions and testing and debugging programs. Visual programming languages (VPL) will be used to introduce topics such as objects and object oriented programming, methods, logic, control and data structures. Students will program an animated world and create games using sequential, conditional, and looping algorithms.

3 credits - Class meets once a week, on Saturday mornings or on one weekday after school. 

ENG 105 — Creative Writing    

An introduction to the practice of written expression in prose, poetic, and dramatic forms; students develop greater skill through the experience of various literary structures and discover how to think as literary citizens of the world.  

3 credits - Class meets once a week, on Saturday mornings or on one weekday after school.   

CS 101 — Child Psychology Development I

An introduction to the study of human development processes, theories and variations, which will include the impact of culture, disability, socioeconomic level, personal health and safety, nutrition and the principles and theories of development during the first two years of life. The course will address the concepts of collaboration and parent/child relationships, inclusion, past and present abusive and dangerous environments and the impact of technology on child bearing and child-rearing.

3 credits - Class meets once a week, on Saturday mornings or on one weekday after school.   

BIO 110 — Current Topics in Biology

A consideration of biological topics of current interest to society including genetic engineering, gene banks, the human genome project, reproductive technologies, cloning, and antibiotic resistance. The laboratory component will introduce the student to modern techniques employed by biologists in the investigation of the aforementioned topics.    

3 credits - Class meets once a week, on Saturday mornings or on one weekday after school.    

HS 215 — Human Services    

This human services course explores the interrelationship between the community, its human service needs, and the response of the human service delivery system to meet these needs. A history of human services is covered, as are the political, social, cultural, and economic forces that give rise to specific community problems, attitudes, and behaviors. The range of human service target populations will be introduced as well as the role of the human services worker in those community environments. The culminating activity will be a basic community assessment.  

3 credits - Class meets once a week, on Saturday mornings or on one weekday after school.     

Previous Semesters

Summer 2019

Courses

ENG 120 — Poetry Writing

An introductory creative writing course examining poetic traditions and contemporary poets as a means of fostering students' own writing. Students will review one another's drafts in workshop format, producing a portfolio of poems by the end of the semester. A term paper is also required.

3 credits - Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., July 1 through July 24 (Class does not meet on July 4.)

BIO 145 — Marine Biology 

This course will explore the marine organisms: who they are, what they do, how they interact with one another and with the sea around them, and how their lives connect with ours. Attention will also be given to the oceans that sustain them. Extensive field work is involved. 

3 credits - Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., July 1 through July 24 (Class does not meet on July 4.)

HTM 100  — Hospitality Management

A basic course in general management concepts and practices to acquaint the student with theories and principles of a hospitality industry organization, including motivation, leadership, and communications. This summer session will include a number of exciting visits to industry-related sites, as well as opportunities for students to interview professionals in their specific fields of interest.

3 credits - Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., August 12 through August 23. Online final reflection due by the 25th.

ENG 109 — Analytical Writing (*ACES PROGRAM ONLY)     

The purpose of this course is to sharpen ELL and post-ELL students’ analytical writing and reading skills in preparation for the SAT exam and coursework they will encounter as undergraduates. In order to facilitate these outcomes, students will study the rhetorical forms of the personal narrative, first by reading several non-fiction essays by established writers, and then by writing their own personal, experience-based essays. Through daily journal entries, revisions, and a final portfolio, students will practice self-exploration and reflection, while cultivating readiness for higher education and beyond.    

*This program is for Advanced English Language Learners only. Students interested in this program should contact Catherine Meehan ([email protected]) before applying.

3 credits - Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., July 1 through July 24 (Class does not meet on July 4.)

 

Spring 2019

Courses

COM 125 — Foundations of Computer Programming Using Animation

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students will learn how to use computers for problem solving by creating algorithms, coding solutions and testing and debugging programs. Visual programming languages (VPL) will be used to introduce topics such as objects and object oriented programming, methods, logic, control and data structures. Students will program an animated world and create games using sequential, conditional, and looping algorithms.

3 credits - Saturdays 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., February 9 through May 25 (Class does not meet on February 23 or April 20)

BIO 110 — Current Topics in Biology

A consideration of biological topics of current interest to society including genetic engineering, gene banks, the human genome project, reproductive technologies, cloning, and antibiotic resistance. The laboratory component will introduce the student to modern techniques employed by biologists in the investigation of the aforementioned topics.

3 credits - Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m., February 9 through May 25 (Class does not meet on February 23 or April 20)

ENG 107 — Fiction Writing

A creative writing course that focuses on the practice of fictional prose forms, both long and short. Students write from various narrative prompts and/or develop independent works-in-progress. They also gain experience in responding to literature through writing, leading to greater skill in their own creative work.  

3 Credits - Wednesdays 4 p.m. - 7 p.m., February 6 through May 22 (Class does not meet on February 20 or April 24)

CS 101 — Child Psychology and Development I

An introduction to the study of human development processes, theories and variations, which will include the impact of culture, disability, socioeconomic level, personal health and safety, nutrition and the principles and theories of development during the first two years of life. The course will address the concepts of collaboration and parent/child relationships, inclusion, past and present abusive and dangerous environments and the impact of technology on child bearing and child-rearing.

3 Credits - Wednesdays 4 p.m. - 7 p.m., February 6 through May 22 (Class does not meet on February 20 or April 24)


And, for students with a particular interest in the healthcare industry, we are offering the following:

HS 215 — Human Services

This human services course explores the interrelationship between the community, its human service needs, and the response of the human service delivery system to meet these needs. A history of human services is covered, as are the political, social, cultural, and economic forces that give rise to specific community problems, attitudes, and behaviors. The range of human service target populations will be introduced as well as the role of the human services worker in those community environments. The culminating activity will be a basic community assessment.

3 Credits - Wednesdays 4 p.m. - 7 p.m., February 6 through May 22 (Class does not meet on February 20 or April 24)

Fall 2018

Courses

COM 150 — Introduction to Computer Programming

This course offers a basic introduction to computer hardware and software. Elementary programming techniques will be taught using Visual Basic.Net. Emphasis will be on problem solving using the computer.

3 Credits - Saturdays 10 a.m.-1 p.m., October 13 through January 26 (no class November 24 or December 29)

BIO 115 — Introduction to Human Inheritance

An introduction to the study of human heredity and its relationship to human welfare. This course will address concepts such as cellular division, Mendelian principles, use of punnett squares, chromosomal abnormalities, the epigenome, and the use of biotechnology in the study of genes.

3 Credits - Saturdays 9 a.m.-1 p.m., October 13 through January 26 (no class November 24 or December 29)

ENG 105 — Creative Writing

This course offers an introduction to the practice of written expression in prose, poetic, and dramatic forms; students develop greater skill through the experience of various literary structures and discover how to think as literary citizens of the world. 

3 Credits - Tuesdays 4 p.m.-7 p.m., October 16 through January 29 (no class December 25 or January 1)

REC 277 — Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation

This course is designed to help prepare students for a career in Therapeutic Recreation. It provides an introduction to the philosophies, procedures, and clinical practices of Therapeutic Recreation including leisure theories and concepts, client assessment, writing behavioral goals, treatment intervention and implementation, documentation and evaluation, and the role of Therapeutic Recreation in relation to current treatment approaches. 

3 Credits - Tuesdays 4 p.m.-7 p.m., October 16 through January 29 (no class December 25 or January 1)